What Is the Best Sonic Toothbrush?

Sonic toothbrushes have become extremely popular over the years. They were first introduced to the market in 1983 by Sonicare. Since they were released, the heads and vibration technologies have advanced dramatically. If you are shopping for a sonic toothbrush, chances are that you want to find the best one on the market. Before you start shopping for a sonic toothbrush, you need to understand that not all electric toothbrushes are classified as sonic toothbrushes. An electric device will vibrate at speeds of 3000 to 8000 strokes per minute. A sonic toothbrush on the other hand will operate at 30,000 to 40,000 vibrations per minute. As you can see, there is a major difference in the efficiency of cleaning. Learn what features to look for when you are shopping for your oral hygiene tool.

What is the Best Product You Can Buy?

There are so many different models on the market that choosing the best model can be extremely difficult. The first thing to look for is a vibrating head. Some heads only move back-and-forth and others will vibrate. Vibration will loosen the food and plaque. Consider the speed at which the toothbrush vibrates and look for adjustable speeds so you can get familiar with the feel when you are first using the model.

You should also look for other features like a timer. A timer can be helpful for people who rush their brushing sessions. When you live a busy life, the idea of brushing for 2 minutes may sound too long. It is imperative to brush for 2 minutes so you thoroughly clean all of your quadrants. With a timer, you will be alerted when you have reached that 2 minute mark.

You should look for a brand that comes with several different head options. You might want a soft-bristled brush or a medium bristle. You might need a smaller head because you have a small mouth. Make sure you can choose what is comfortable for you and look for brush heads that are not too expensive to replace.

Some of the more expensive brands come with advanced features that are designed to make use easier. You might want a rechargeable battery or a docking station. Consider your budget and the features you will really use. If you choose the best model for you, you will see less plaque when you floss and your dentist will give you a clean bill of oral health.

Sonic Versus Mario

Even though Mario is ten years older, a very good case can be made for Sonic, when it comes to the title of “Most Popular Video Game Character” of ALL TIME!! Let look at the “Tale of the Tape”:

Sonic from Sega, is a blue anthropomorphic (changes shape) hedgehog with the ability to run faster than the speed of sound; his talent for speed forms a large part of the game play of the series. He is 15 years old. Sonic has been described as being “like the wind.” He is noted for being heroic, adventurous, and free-spirited. He enjoys relaxation, but is never one to rest in the face of injustice. He is extremely benevolent, and would willingly put himself at risk for others, taking on any challenge that confronts him without hesitation. Throughout his 15 years of existence, Sonic has never been linked to any job he is always collecting jewelry, so access to funds is not a problem for him.

Mario from Nintendo, now at the ripe old age of 25, is more of a “George Foreman” type, Mario is always portrayed as being a kind-hearted and brave hero. He helps those in need without any hesitation. Despite his status as a great hero, Mario is very humble. His cheerful personality and love of life make him a very approachable video game character. He also has a love of pasta and pizza, as the stereotypical Italian does. Mario is suppose to be a plumber by trade, but in all his years I don’t recall him ever working on any “plumbing” jobs, but always in the “rescue business” saving princess’ or Mushroom kingdoms from Large “Dino” type animals.

Based on these descriptions, they appear to have more in common than one might originally have thought.

Sonic’s speed would be his biggest asset in a match up with Mario while Mario counters with his tremendous jumping ability and Mario also carries a BIG HAMMER. Maybe this should be a “Steel Cage” match? LOL

Mario counters with his experience and his “jumping ability” which would be the deciding factor I believe in this battle, as he would continue to stomp on Sonic’s head. Now on to the “Game breakdown”:

MARIO

1. Donkey Kong

2. Mario Bros

3. Super Mario Bros

4. Super Mario Bros 2

5. Super Mario Land

6. Super Mario Bros 3

7. Super Mario World

8. Super Mario Land 2

9. Super Mario Land 3

10. Super Mario Bros DX

SONIC

1. Sonic the Hedgehog

2. Sonic 2

3. Sonic 3

4. Sonic & Knuckles

5. Sonic CD

6. Sonic 3D Blast

7. Sonic Adventure

8. Sonic Adventure 2

9. Sonic Hero’s

10. Sonic Spinball

After reviewing the above “tale of the tape”, it is my conclusion that the winner of a contest between these two behemoths would be Mario by a Knock Out. I believe that his perseverance and stamina would wear down Sonic and render Sonic’s one advantage (his speed) worthless.

On-Demand CRM – Integration Hub for the Small Business or Enterprise Department

There is an interesting phenomenon happening in the small and medium business segment. The widespread adoption of on-demand or software as a service (saas) CRM, led by Salesforce.com, and followed by companies such as NetSuite and RightNow Technologies.

Well, that’s not really new.

What is new is the expanded use of saas CRM software within these mini-enterprises, whether independent businesses or smaller divisions or departments of larger corporations, as their principal business platform. Since saas CRM manages the lifeblood of the business, sales and customers, and is increasingly more user friendly and flexible, it is becoming the preferred method for companies to manage their business.

As a result, it is also becoming the de facto integration hub, or SOA enabler, for the smaller enterprise.

A case in point is the experience of a well-known educational products sales company. It’s parent company sells educational toys through retailers. However, it launched a division that sells education-oriented items to schools and school districts, such as a handheld screen-based interactive tool that uses story narratives to teach English proficiency to non-native English speakers. This newer division established a territory sales model, with geographically-based sales executives selling to school districts in their area.

The main corporate entity has only a handful of account managers who sell to large retailers such as Wal-Mart and Toys’r’Us. Whereas it is geared towards a retail sales model and related B2B IT infrastructure, the newer division had the infrastructure needs of a territory-based direct sales model. They required a CRM application to track leads, opportunities, and closed sales, and because of the reduced bandwidth of this smaller business unit, they required the efficiency gains of an automated commission calculating application.

With no dedicated IT resources (IT resources are tied to corporate and are available “on-loan” to the new division), and a need to ramp-up quickly, the division chose to bring the CRM and commission calculation functionality of the on-demand model. They chose Salesforce.com and Xactly Corporation, respectively, to fulfill these functions. The one on-premise application they had access to was Oracle Financials for accounting.

The missing piece was to integrate these applications together. They chose to go with a packaged integration platform, adopting their subscription-based pricing model and on-premise software.

In addition to being the CRM platform for the new division, Salesforce.com is also serving as the de facto “enterprise service bus” to incorporate the accounting functionality of Oracle Financials, and to trigger Xactly to do it’s job of calculating sales commissions.

This use of Salesforce.com as a de facto on-demand ESB platform was noted in an August 2007 white paper entitled “Busting Myths of On-Demand Integration,” by Peter Coffee, Director of Platform Research.

“On-demand platforms exhibit the growing capability to provide a foundation for integration,” he said, citing a May 2007 announcement of the Salesforce.com SOA technology that enables the exposure and consumption of web services.

In the same paragraph he notes:

“This is not to say, however, that a move to a Web services protocol strategy (such as that of using a saas application such as Salesforce.com) is a prerequisite for on-demand integration…there are options available for use with the salesforce.com platform” such as custom coding or a third party integration platform.

In other words, on-demand applications, Salesforce.com being the most prominent, are quickly establishing themselves as integration hubs the way ESB providers such as Sonic Software, IBM’s Websphere, and BEA’s Weblogic were formulated to be.

These SOA solutions, however, are cost-prohibitive for smaller companies, divisions or departments, and are often managed by enterprise IT staffs who are unresponsive to the needs of the department. These smaller enterprises have to fend for themselves, and are adopting on-demand applications that require little to no IT involvement.

IT typically has to get involved when it comes to integration, according to Coffee. Such was the case with the educational products company. Their IT department provided the input that the newer division needed to give the technical “thumbs-up” to the integration solution. But due to human bandwidth issues they decided to go with a fully delivered integration solution as opposed to the traditional toolset that is typically sold to IT departments.

Tying together Salesforce.com, Oracle Financials and Xactly Corporation was done in the span of four months and cost less than $50,000. Why did it take that long? Because they had to take a breather between deciding on an integration vendor and a commission calculation vendor.

Compare that with enterprise application integration projects which typically take nine months or more and cost hundreds of thousands of dollars, and you can see why Salesforce.com, together with fully configured integration solutions, are quickly becoming the “integration hubs” or systems of record for the smaller enterprise.